Beer Reviews · sour

#13 Offbeat Oddity Kaffir Leaf Sour – The hopless brew from Crewe.

Review #13 Offbeat Oddity Kaffir Leaf Sour 72/100

Offbeat Brewery has been on the go since 2010, and was founded by a lady called Michelle Kelsall.  As their website says, they have “A mission to create flavour packed beers, often loaded with hops”.  The beer in this review has one of those two things…it’s packed with tons of flavour.

This brew has not had a single hop added during the brewing process, none for dry hopping and none have gone into the boil.  Instead, the brewers at Offbeat have introduced Kaffir lime leaves into the boil, providing an extremely fragrant character to the beer with citrus notes so unique they could not be recreated with any other ingredient.

There are a number of sour beers out there, all with different character profiles such as Lambic, Gueuze, Flanders Red and so on.  This particular sour’s tartness comes from what has been used to infuse the beer rather than the chemical compounds produced from wild yeast and bacteria.  If you’re new to the sour beer game and you’re thrown in at the deep end with some of the more acetic Cantillons, you’ll probably never dip your toe in the water again.  The Kaffir Leaf Sour is a good place to start.

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Out of the bottle and into the glass, it’s massively hazy due to the large yeast presence, I’d say medium carbonation and the beer produces no head at all which I don’t have an issue with as it’s not a traditional style of beer.  Deep honey colour and leaves behind quite a lot of yeast sediment in the bottle.

On the nose, there heavy citrus notes coming in from the Kaffir lime leaf which massively dominates the aroma profile but it’s definitely not one dimensional, there’s a decent sweetness coming through from the malt.

On the palate, it’s more aromatic than sour with notes of Rose’s lime cordial and citrus oil.  Finishing up, this is definitely a delicious beer but I can’t help but think it would have benefited from spending a few months in an oak cask with a Brett culture to add some acetic notes to the beer.

Cheers

Matt

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